Who Cares if You’re a Skilled Professional Photographer?

by Mark Stall                                                                                         12 November 2013

The state of portrait photography today is a free-for-all. The traditional highly experienced photographer has relied on a known variety of techniques in lighting and posing to achieve successful portraits. The newer photographer can design their portraits based on the newest trends or something they saw by someone else, but only if they have the skills or patience to learn it. Every photographer must use a combination of personal style and well thought out lighting to design a portrait the customer will like.
Customers select a portrait photographer based on a referral, an ad, social media or they’ve always used the same photographer. Photographers need to know what particular style the customer is looking for and what is the reason for the portrait. We all agree the goal of the photographer is to please their customer and do what they’re looking for without sacrificing something.
Years ago I attended a few lectures by the master photographer Joyce Tenneson. Ms. Tenneson will take a limited amount of portraits based on getting to know her subject intimately before proceeding. Upon completion of the session, she will select and present her client with her final choice. Period. Few of us have the luxury of selecting the final portrait without the customers say, but Ms. Tenneson has the ability to create and interpret a portrait through her understanding and commitment to the craft.

There’s more to being a portrait photographer than just taking a picture. And it should be more than just placing your subject or subjects in front of backdrop and shooting. For you to succeed and prosper you must study today’s trends and understand past photographers to become a skilled practitioner. Every successful photographer before 2005 made some major effort to study photography. Starting out, they attended as many workshops as they could and practiced with whatever equipment they could afford to accomplish the job. Passion isn’t enough today to please your customers. We must give this field of photogrqaphy everything we got to remain a respected profession and only the most skilled will succeed.

  • Article by Mark Stall, http://www.prostudiousa.com/blog/
  • http://www.prostudiousa.com/  For your Best in Professional Photography Supplies!

Digital camera battery use knowledge

When using a digital camera saves the battery power used as far as possible. First is avoids using the nonessential focal variation operation as far as possible, if wants the focal variation really, suggested that moves camera’s position to obtain the same focal variation effect. is avoids using the flashing light frequently, the flashing light consumes the electricity, if not has no recourse should better not use. Furthermore when adjusts the image should better use the viewfinder, but do not use the LCD display monitor. The LCD display monitor’s energy consumption is astonishing, therefore best little uses, because the ordinary photography work may complete through the viewfinder. Certainly cannot to save the electric quantity to force out it, for instance when short distance photography the LCD display monitor is the indispensable important part. Finally is remembered, when not in use digital cameras to turn it off.

When use the digital camera battery for a long time, the ACER aspire 3050 battery needed to be clean. Many people may focus only on digital camera lens and body clean, but never thought the battery should be cleaned. To avoid power loss problems, be sure to maintain the battery contact point of both sides and the battery cover’s interior is clean. If necessary, use a soft, clean cloth and gently wipe dry. Can not use chemical or other cleaning of the cleaning agents have solubility.

pay attention to use the correct method in the process of charging Digital camera batteries. Best to use the original digital camera battery charger, which will help extend battery life. The charging time depends on the charger and the battery used, and the use of voltage stability and so on factors. If this is the first use of the COMPAQ Presario r3000 Battery (or batteries for months not used), to remember, lithium battery charging time must be more than 6 hours, Ni-MH battery must be more than 14 hours, otherwise, will be shorter battery life.

If digital camera battery has residual power, try not to repeat the charge to ensure battery life. If you charge Ni-Cd battery for a while only to stop charging power and then recharge it, doing so is the battery can not be filled. This is what they call the “memory effect”, this effect would reduce the battery’s total capacity and the use of time. Over time, less and less stored charge, the battery will also use more and more quickly.

If planned does not use the digital camera for a the long time , Should take out the digital camera battery from the digital camera perhaps the Dell inspiron 1501 Battery charger, and discharges it completely.For a long time stored in the digital camera battery charger, or within, may leak and damage.Deposits the battery in the dry and cool environment, moreover do not deposits the battery and the general metal goods together.

Thanks Article alley: http://www.articlealley.com/index.php

Thank you,

John Phoenix & Lisa Catera
Entrepreneurs in business to make life better for everyone.
913 744 3330
www.seeyourphotos.net 
Your Best Choice in Online Proofing
www.photoimagingnews.net 
Latest Photography News you can Count on.

“You will get all you want in life if you will help enough other people get what they want! – Zig Ziglar”

How much time to allow for Wedding Photography?

How much time to allow for Wedding Photography?

One of the more popular questions I am asked is, “how much time do I need to allow for wedding photography?” The answer to that question hinges on what you wish to achieve with your photography, and how much you are willing to collaborate with your wedding photographer.

While the candid, unobtrusive style of wedding photojournalism still remains popular, the wedding photos that my clients respond to the most are the stylized, directed shots. The “artistic shots” as the brides and grooms often refer to. These shots involve private time alone; away from the family and friends.

The photographic environment is utilized as a stage setting. This setting creates an atmosphere for the wedding couple to step into a fantasy world where they become whoever they wish to be. The couple is often directed through various poses and creative ideas at the gentle coaxing of the wedding photographer. Soon the camera is forgotten about and the magic happens.

Pure emotions emerge that bring out the sexiness and playfulness, the glamour and sophistication, the serenity and mystery, or the love and passion between each couple. Not only do these wedding photographs yield beautiful shots, they also provide a moment of quiet time in the midst of a busy day that races by so quickly.

The price however, is time. If you want these images, be forewarned that you should allot at least an hour specifically for this style of work. In other parts of the world, it is normal for the couple to take a couple of hours during the wedding day to go to one or several exciting locations for their portrait time.

If these images matter the most to you, consider when you could devote the extra time. Do you meet before the ceremony? Do you miss your cocktail hour? Do you take time off at some quiet point during your reception? Perhaps it necessitates scheduling some portrait time on a different day. Keep in mind, it is your day and the scheduling and timing is in your control. In my experience, I have found the minimum of one full hour to be extremely beneficial.

Common Scenario - All in One Wedding Venue

Couples often had their wedding ceremony and reception in one location which enabled us to spend one solid hour doing photography. The scheduling is straight forward, and no extensive planning was required. We were able to do intimate portraits as well as utilize the setting that drew them there in the first place.

The Adventure – Embrace the Offsite Scenery

In one of my experiences, the reception was a forty-five minute drive from the ceremony site. During our drive, we made a few stops along the way. Not only did we manage to get some wonderful shots at a local train station and park, we also had a great time doing it! Because of the unobtrusive manner in which I shoot, the additional benefit to the couple was some quiet time together before regrouping for the social activities of the night.

Go with the Flow – Prepare for Hard Pressed Wedding Photography

On the other hand, some wedding couples prefer not to invest a specific schedule dedicated for portraits, or to prepare for wedding photography in general. In this case, I advise my clients to allow five minutes per grouping for the “traditional” formals and an additional fifteen minutes for shots of the couple alone. If time is crunched, I will often photograph the family first and then request about fifteen minutes with the couple privately at a quiet point during the reception.

The flow of this type of photography arrangement demands the ability to adapt to situations, and often presents great challenges for the wedding photographer. At one particular wedding I had a window of thirty minutes before the ceremony to photograph the bride and groom, wedding party and family members. As the minutes ticked down with no key players to be found, a growing congregation of family members began to appear. As I started to photograph the family, the list seemed to grow rather than recede, and still without a full wedding party or bride and groom. When the bride finally arrived, we were down to ten minutes before the ceremony time. Ten minutes to go and a bride and groom greeting guests that arrived from out of the country, we were very hard pressed to accomplish what was requested. In the end we had to schedule some additional time during the reception to finish shooting.

Conclusion

When you are looking through samples of photojournalistic work, or viewing wedding portrait of other couples prior to your wedding day, be aware of what you are drawn to. Feel free to show samples to your photographer and discuss how much time would be necessary to achieve the images you like. The more communication you have between yourself and the photographer, the happier you will be with your results.