Who Cares if You’re a Skilled Professional Photographer?

by Mark Stall                                                                                         12 November 2013

The state of portrait photography today is a free-for-all. The traditional highly experienced photographer has relied on a known variety of techniques in lighting and posing to achieve successful portraits. The newer photographer can design their portraits based on the newest trends or something they saw by someone else, but only if they have the skills or patience to learn it. Every photographer must use a combination of personal style and well thought out lighting to design a portrait the customer will like.
Customers select a portrait photographer based on a referral, an ad, social media or they’ve always used the same photographer. Photographers need to know what particular style the customer is looking for and what is the reason for the portrait. We all agree the goal of the photographer is to please their customer and do what they’re looking for without sacrificing something.
Years ago I attended a few lectures by the master photographer Joyce Tenneson. Ms. Tenneson will take a limited amount of portraits based on getting to know her subject intimately before proceeding. Upon completion of the session, she will select and present her client with her final choice. Period. Few of us have the luxury of selecting the final portrait without the customers say, but Ms. Tenneson has the ability to create and interpret a portrait through her understanding and commitment to the craft.

There’s more to being a portrait photographer than just taking a picture. And it should be more than just placing your subject or subjects in front of backdrop and shooting. For you to succeed and prosper you must study today’s trends and understand past photographers to become a skilled practitioner. Every successful photographer before 2005 made some major effort to study photography. Starting out, they attended as many workshops as they could and practiced with whatever equipment they could afford to accomplish the job. Passion isn’t enough today to please your customers. We must give this field of photogrqaphy everything we got to remain a respected profession and only the most skilled will succeed.

  • Article by Mark Stall, http://www.prostudiousa.com/blog/
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“Rockstar” – Most of the time it’s just a word! Skip Cohen

Here’s the type of “rockstar” nobody will argue about taken for Sekonic by SCU Faculty member and one of the industry’s very best lighting educators, Bobbi Lane.  Please Read on…Picture

by Skip Cohen

In the DWF Newsletter a couple of years ago there was a link to a discussion about the word “rockstar”.  It went on for over a year and just recently it came up again in one of the forums I follow. How long this silly discussion will go on is irrelevant.  What is important is the topic itself.  What I just don’t get it is why so many people get hung up on a word.  I especially don’t understand the cyber space venom that gets people’s blood boiling in the discussions.

Are there people who misuse the word?  Of course there are, but we’ve always had that challenge. How many times have you ordered something in a restaurant because somebody told you it was amazing, only to be disappointed? Or, how about a movie the critics loved, but you were underwhelmed? It concerns me more there are people calling themselves “professional” photographers who are anything but professional.  Why doesn’t that provoke the same kind of response?

With the energy those people who want to argue over the misuse of the word “rockstar”, they could accomplish so much more promoting education in technique and marketing to elevate the word “professional” instead.

For me personally, “rockstar” is a word of respect and I use it all the time.  Joe McNally is a “rockstar” and the reference is related to a great photographer, who’s got something to say, concepts we can learn from, is entertaining when he presents and like a “rockstar” he packs the house!

But the use of the word “rockstar” is a cultural thing, not exclusive to photography.  In every profession there arerockstars.  My wife, Sheila, worked at Akron Children’s Hospital and there were a number of people who wererockstars, because they were the best in their specialty and the word is used in admiration.

In photography we’ve lost a lot of “rockstars” over the last decade…Dean Collins, Don Blair, Monte Zucker, Henry Froelich, Richard Avedon, Eddie Adams, Arnold Newman and Herb Ritts,  just to name a few.  All of them wererockstars in their own right, we just didn’t use the word then.  They left behind a legacy of concepts and standards we all aspire to achieve, which in a way makes many of you “aspiring rockstars”.

For me, it’s just a word used appropriately sometimes and at other times it’s not. Regardless that doesn’t change my opinion that arguing about the word itself is as relevant as the old battle between wedding photojournalists and traditional wedding photographers. Better yet, how relevant is the ongoing battle between Canon and Nikon owners, when you’ve got products like Panasonic’s LUMIX GH3 and GX7?

And if you honestly want to argue with me, check out the expansion of the gear landscape over the last year with  new products from Panasonic, Fujifilm, Sony and Samsung. We’ve all got a front row seat to a paradigm shift!

See more of Skip Cohen’s Blog here: http://www.skipcohenuniversity.com/

You’ll be glad you did!  John Phoenix

Digital camera battery use knowledge

When using a digital camera saves the battery power used as far as possible. First is avoids using the nonessential focal variation operation as far as possible, if wants the focal variation really, suggested that moves camera’s position to obtain the same focal variation effect. is avoids using the flashing light frequently, the flashing light consumes the electricity, if not has no recourse should better not use. Furthermore when adjusts the image should better use the viewfinder, but do not use the LCD display monitor. The LCD display monitor’s energy consumption is astonishing, therefore best little uses, because the ordinary photography work may complete through the viewfinder. Certainly cannot to save the electric quantity to force out it, for instance when short distance photography the LCD display monitor is the indispensable important part. Finally is remembered, when not in use digital cameras to turn it off.

When use the digital camera battery for a long time, the ACER aspire 3050 battery needed to be clean. Many people may focus only on digital camera lens and body clean, but never thought the battery should be cleaned. To avoid power loss problems, be sure to maintain the battery contact point of both sides and the battery cover’s interior is clean. If necessary, use a soft, clean cloth and gently wipe dry. Can not use chemical or other cleaning of the cleaning agents have solubility.

pay attention to use the correct method in the process of charging Digital camera batteries. Best to use the original digital camera battery charger, which will help extend battery life. The charging time depends on the charger and the battery used, and the use of voltage stability and so on factors. If this is the first use of the COMPAQ Presario r3000 Battery (or batteries for months not used), to remember, lithium battery charging time must be more than 6 hours, Ni-MH battery must be more than 14 hours, otherwise, will be shorter battery life.

If digital camera battery has residual power, try not to repeat the charge to ensure battery life. If you charge Ni-Cd battery for a while only to stop charging power and then recharge it, doing so is the battery can not be filled. This is what they call the “memory effect”, this effect would reduce the battery’s total capacity and the use of time. Over time, less and less stored charge, the battery will also use more and more quickly.

If planned does not use the digital camera for a the long time , Should take out the digital camera battery from the digital camera perhaps the Dell inspiron 1501 Battery charger, and discharges it completely.For a long time stored in the digital camera battery charger, or within, may leak and damage.Deposits the battery in the dry and cool environment, moreover do not deposits the battery and the general metal goods together.

Thanks Article alley: http://www.articlealley.com/index.php

Thank you,

John Phoenix & Lisa Catera
Entrepreneurs in business to make life better for everyone.
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“You will get all you want in life if you will help enough other people get what they want! – Zig Ziglar”

The Art of Digital Photography

Digital photography: The art of digital photography

Many of the techniques used in traditional photography also apply to digital photography. The composition of the picture, use of light, line, shape, pattern, etc. also apply to digital photography. Three elements that are different in digital photography are white balance, picture resolution, and digital effects.

White Balance

In a traditional camera, film records and determines the colors of the scene captured in the photograph. As digital cameras have no film to interpret color, they use white balance settings for this purpose. These settings (called Kelvin temperature ratings) are represented by symbols for sun, indoor light, clouds and shade on most digital displays and can be manually selected. The Auto function, however, enables the camera to adjust the settings automatically. For most non-professional needs, this is quite satisfactory.

Some digital cameras contain a histogram function that will also help you adjust your light exposure.

Resolution

Digital cameras record images in pixels. If you expand a picture on your computer with graphic software by zooming in on the picture, you will eventually see the picture rendered as a series of colored dots. The more dots per inch in a picture, the higher the resolution. High-resolution photos have better image quality and bigger file sizes as well.

Many digital cameras on the market allow the user to select the low or high-resolution settings. Since resolution affects file size, more of the photos taken in low resolution can be stored in your camera at a time. High-resolution images may saved in BMP, TIFF, or RAW image formats. These are large file type images. High resolution settings vary with each camera. A low resolution setting on one camera is a high resolution setting on another. It all depends on the camera’s megapixel resolution that could be anywhere in the range of .1 megapixels to 9.1 megapixels.

Resolution is an important consideration when buying your digital camera. If you are only going to be using your images on the web, very high-resolution images will not be as mandatory for you (although high resolution graphics allow more manipulation of the graphic in graphics software programs). Web images are typically lower resolution images since file size is a consideration for the web. If you are going to be printing your images, however, high resolution is necessary for a quality print. To be able to expand an image for an 8×10 print is going to require a high-resolution graphic for a good quality photo.

Digital Effects

Many digital cameras also have built-in effects that can be used to change the presentation of your photos. Fisheye is an example of one such feature that will reshape an image giving it a totally different effect. Soft-focus, Portrait, Scene, Landscape, and Wide-angle are some of the focusing effect capabilities that your digital cameral may have. These are nice features to have fun with. If you have a graphics software program, your images can be further manipulated once you have downloaded your images to your computer.

By: Vicki Zolenski